Washing produce is a step like washing hands

How utility, phone, internet companies are helping

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Some questions may be running through your mind as the coronavirus pandemic wears on. 

Is that apple at the supermarket contaminated? Did someone with COVID-19 sneeze on the peaches?

While there’s no evidence or documented cases of COVID-19 that suggest the virus can be transmitted through food, experts told USA TODAY that there still is a chance to get sick if you pick up an item someone infected has sneezed or coughed on.

And while most people make good decisions, all it takes is one bad one to increase the risk. In Pennsylvania, a woman went through a grocery store coughing on food in what the store’s co-owner called a “twisted prank.”

Felicia Goulet-Miller, an instructor of microbiology at Florida Gulf Coast University, said food items, including fresh produce, can spread the disease.

“If the produce is contaminated by a sick person and you touch it and then touch your face, you can become infected,” Goulet-Miller said, noting it’s another reason not to touch your faces in public and to wash hands after touching things touched by others.



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By Javier Manning

Javier has been in the field of content writing for almost 8 Years as he hails from the Biotechnology background. The edifying articles portray her craving towards language. His keen hobby of reading technological innovations related books or articles has sown the seed of being a well-versed editor with the current scenario of numerous industry verticals. He is one of the valuable assets to this publication. The Industry News Press has awarded him with a senior editors post based on his skillful performance to date.